Inhoud blog
  • Waarom leerlingen steeds slechter presteren op Nederlandse scholen; en grotendeels ook toepasselijk op Vlaams onderwijs!?
  • Waarom leerlingen steeds slechter presteren op Nederlandse scholen; en grotendeels ook toepasselijk op Vlaams onderwijs!?
  • Inspectie in Engeland kiest ander spoor dan in VlaanderenI Klemtoon op kernopdracht i.p.v. 1001 wollige ROK-criteria!
  • Meer lln met ernstige gedragsproblemen in l.o. -Verraste en verontwaardigde beleidsmakers Crevits (CD&V) & Steve Vandenberghe (So.a) ... wassen handen in onschuld en pakken uit met ingrepen die geen oplossing bieden!
  • Schorsing probleemleerlingen in lager onderwijs: verraste en verontwaardigde beleidsmakers wassen handen in onschuld en pakken uit met niet-effective maatregelen
    Zoeken in blog

    Beoordeel dit blog
      Zeer goed
      Goed
      Voldoende
      Nog wat bijwerken
      Nog veel werk aan
     
    Onderwijskrant Vlaanderen
    Vernieuwen: ja, maar in continuïteit!
    01-11-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Effective teaching of numeracy : Not too realistic, but functional!  (Freudenthal vs Feys)

    Waarom ontdekkend en contextueel rekenen à la Freudenthal Instituut, ZILL-leerplanvisie ... niet effectief is

    Twee bijdragen: (1) Analyse van Pieter Van Biervliet (2)Analyse van Raf  Feys

    Bijdrage 1 Effective teaching of numeracy : Not too realistic, but functional!  (Freudenthal vs Feys)

    Pieter Van Biervliet

    November 2008

    RENO, Centre for Teacher Training Torhout (KATHO), Belgium

    What makes an effective teacher of numeracy?  A look at the results of the last PISA assessment 2003 can be very interesting in order to find an answer.  PISA means “Programme for International Student Assessment”.  The aim of this assessment is to measure the knowledge and skills in sciences, problem solving, reading and mathematics for 15-year old pupils in 30 OECD-countries (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) plus 11 partner countries (such as Hongkong, Brazil etc.).

    Flemish pupils (in the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium) score very good on arithmetic skills compared to children from other countries.  As a matter of fact, they have the best results of all.  Even the weakest score much better than in other countries, and for instance as good as the best pupils of Italy (De Meyer, Pauly & Van de Poele, 2005, p. 5).  It’s very interesting to point out the reason why Flemish teachers instruct maths so effectively.  A comparison with the Realistic Mathematics Education (RME) approach in The Netherlands can be useful.  The RME orientation is very different from the so-called Functional Mathematics Education (FME) in Flanders. Pupils of The Netherlands score less than Flemish children (5th rank).  That difference is statistically significant.  

    Realistic Mathematics Education (RME) was developed since 1971 at the Freudenthalinstitute in Utrecht, in The Netherlands.  The mathematician Hans Freudenthal (1906 – 1990) was the “father” of that movement (Treffers, 1991).  RME has also been adopted by a large number of schools in countries all over the world such as England, Germany, Denmark, Spain, Portugal, South Africa, Brazil, USA, Japan and Malaysia (de Lange, 1996).  Functional Mathematics Education (FME)  is typical for the Flemish tradition.  However, in the 70’s this tradition was interrupted by the “Modern Math Reform Movement” when pupils had to learn maths using sets, relations, functions...  (Papy, 1970).  For weak pupils this approach was a disaster.  Since the 90’s schools in Flanders used again the tradition of FME.

    The most important promoter of FME is Raf Feys, a former lecturer at the RENO teacher training centre for primary school, a department of KATHO, Flemish institute of higher education (Raf Feys, 1998).

    Self exploration vs activating instruction

    Typical for RME is a belief in the ability of self exploration by pupils.  Students should be given the opportunity to reinvent mathematical concepts.  They have to explore situations, to discover and to identify the relevant mathematics.  They have to schematize, and to visualize, to discover regularities, and to develop a ‘model’ resulting in a mathematical concept (de Lange, 1987).  They have to develop all these activities personally.  Hence, due to many similarities with RME, the current constructivist reform movement shows great interest for this approach (Gravenmeijer, 1994): pupils have to construct knowledge and skills by themselves.

    FME stresses more on the importance of guided instruction and exploration by the teacher.  FME too works “inductive”: A problem is posed by the teacher, and pupils have to search a solution.  But, the teacher also explains, discusses, illustrates, demonstrates, asks questions while moving around the class, summarizes… FME is more related to what we call “an activating instruction approach”.

    Perceptual variability vs one fixed representation

    A very important principle in RME is that of “perceptual variability”, meaning that the pupils should be confronted with as many different kinds of materials as possible in order to master the subject well.  For instance, when learning the number 4, realistic methods do not only show the square representation of 4, but also the domino representation of 4, the representation on the beadframe (where each 5 beads have a different colour), and the representation using the so-called Cuisenaire Rods, a Belgian invention.

    FME opts for the use of one fixed representation.  All kinds of didactic considerations decide the choice of such a representation.  For instance, most Flemish teachers don’t use the Cuisenaire Rods anymore because they have no explicit representation of the amount of the number.  To know the number, pupils have to memorize the colour of the rod!   That was a great problem for many pupils.  Sometimes, pupils compare the length of the rods and then they know the amount of the number.  But, that also is still a guessing game.  Moreover, sometimes children have to make unnatural movements when calculating e.g. 5 - 2… so they have to take the yellow rod of 5, then the red rod of 2… but then,  to make the subtraction they have to put the red rod on the yellow one to know the difference.  The movement of “putting on” is very unnatural in making a subtraction.

    In the end, the square representation offers the best image.  It’s also a good fixed representation, because even as a second term in addition sums the representation of 5 remains the same.  Sometimes there is a slight difference (see 4 + 5 vs 3 + 5).  That’s not the case with the beadframe. The representation of the 5 changes each time because of the different colour of each 5 beads on the frame.

    Square representation of “5” (see X):

               in the addition sum 0 + 5 =

     

                X     X        X   

                X     X                              

                in the addition sum 4 + 5 =                  in the addition sum 3 + 5 =

     

                O    O       X     X        X                       O    O       X     X   

                O    O       X     X                                  O    X       X     X

     

    Representation of “5” on beadframe (see _ )

                in the addition sum 0 + 5 =    O O O O O

                in the addition sum 4 + 5 =                  in the addition sum 3 + 5 =

                O O O O O X X X X                            O O O O O X X X

     

    Note:

    O and X represent blocks or beads with a different colour (for instance O = blue and X = red)

     

    Interaction vs guided interaction

    Interaction is an essential aspect of RME.  For instance, there’s a lot of group-work.  In this group-work students are engaged in explaining, justifying, agreeing and disagreeing... Also FME is interactive, but the interaction is guided by the teacher.  The FME teacher provides high quantities of whole-class interactive instruction, in which he discusses and develops solutions and concepts with the pupils through a series of graded questions addressed to the entire class (see also Jones & Allebone, 2000).

    It takes a very long time to gain the curriculum goals when pupils have to explore math operations by themselves.  FME on the other hand is very economic.  Thanks to the guided instruction of the teacher pupils don’t need so much time to gain the same goals.  FME prevents pupils from re-inventing the wheel and diverting their energies into the search of solutions and concepts without the help of the teacher.

    FME teachers try to ensure most pupils achieve the goals in a relatively short time.

    Understanding vs memorising

    In RME mathematical facts are not memorised, for example, pupils don’t have to memorize the multiplication tables. RME stresses more conceptual understanding.  Also FME involves the understanding of strategies and concepts, but  emphasizes as well on the memorisation of a limited amount of math facts (for instance: pupils have to memorize all addition sums until 10, all multiplication tables…).  FME considers children’s factual knowledge, their conceptual understanding and their strategies as integrated aspects of numeracy development (see also Murray, 2000).  When practicing and testing factual knowledge, children will have more energy to solve problems, to think creatively…. There are many similarities to reading processes: Before understanding texts, pupils must have good technical reading skills (Perfetti, 1985).

    So-called straight-ahead, “naked” exercises are much rare in RME textbooks than in FME books.  Pupils always learn math operations in contexts.  FME methods also pay attention to contexts as well as to automation exercises.  Teachers frequently give tempo-exercises. These automation exercises allow the development of factual knowledge.  Otherwise, pupils remain reliant on simple arithmetic techniques, such as counting on one by one or calculating multiplication as repeated addition (Murray, 2000, p. 164).  “Quick recall exercises” are a very important factor of FME.   

    In RME, the teacher’s role is to pose problems, but leave the solution methods open to the students.  Pupils have to build their own constructions.  And… RME teachers must respect these constructions.  For instance, when solving the addition 15 + 13 learners can determine their favourite strategy, which results in all possible solution methods (Beishuizen, Wolters & Broers, 1991, pp. 19-38):

    -              The calculate-through method, also string method or W10-method: the first number is left as a whole (W) and afterwards the tens are processed first; e.g. 15 + 13 15 +10 = 25 25 + 3 = 28.

    -              The partition method or 1010-procedure: the tens and units of both terms are processed separately first; e.g. 15 + 13 10 + 10 = 20 5 + 3 = 8 20 + 8 = 28.

    -              The 10t-procedure: first the tens of both terms are processed, next the units of the first term and afterwards the units of the second term; e.g. 15 +13 10 + 10 = 20 20 + 5 = 25 25 + 3 = 28.

    -              The A10-procedure: add (A) until you reach the next multiple of ten; e.g. 15 + 13 15 + 5 = 20 13 - 5 = 8 20 + 8 = 28.

    FME teachers are no advocates of this variety of calculation methods. Especially the weak arithmeticians need a standard procedure. In FME pupils may develop their own constructions – as REM does - but very quickly the FME teacher starts to analyse the variety of constructions to find the most economic construction.  Most FME teachers prefer the calculate-through method to the other methods for the following reasons (Van der Heijden, 1993, p.180): Arithmeticians who calculate through need less time to response, make less mistakes as to insight, can orientate themselves better, show a higher degree of awareness and control, claim themselves that the W10 is an easier, faster and handier procedure; and in the end they turn out to be more flexible in their use of the other procedures.

    The choice of teaching a standard procedure does however not alter the fact that FME pays attention to flexible calculation which differs from the above method by looking for an easier procedure than the standard one. This is not the case with the above variety of methods. E.g. 75 + 28 can be calculated in various ways: 75 + 20 + 8 or 70 + 20 + 5 + 8 or 75 + 25 +3, etc., but 75 + 30 – 2 is a lot handier. However, the question remains if weak arithmeticians should learn this way or stick to one clear standard strategy. After all, flexible calculation requires a good short-term memory to carry out the different partial operations correctly. Often this is not the case with weak arithmeticians.  Good learners on the other hand may choose their own constructions.  But, first of all they have to master the standard procedure. 

    Integration vs structure

    RME textbooks are not very well structured.  The elements of number system, calculations, solving problems, measures, shapes, space, handling data are not taught separately.  In RME the integration of mathematical concepts is essential.  In real-life contextual problems one usually needs more than algebra or geometry alone.  FME methods focus very strongly on structure.  Subject matters are first taught systematically.  This implies that initially these subjects will be temporarily offered and practised in isolation and only then several skills are brought together when pupils have to solve more complex problems.  In contrast with RME, integration in FME is “the cherry on the cake”! 

    RME teachers start with relatively complex problems.  FME teachers start with rather simple  problems as a condition to tackle more complex problems. This structured approach is also related to the term “cumulative curriculum” (Feys, 1998, p.56).  For instance, a FME textbook takes one type of operation at the time.  Pupils first have to master a simple type of addition (for instance: 15 + 13… without bridge over tens), and then they have to master a more complex addition (for instance: 15 + 18… wíth bridge over tens).       

    Contexts in RME are very amusing and motivating.  For instance:  pupils have to investigate how to divide the surface of a parking-place so they can station as many cars as possible… FME also involves these kinds of contexts but starts with more simple “classic” contexts (sharing sweets, apples etc.).   In doing so they can cope easier with more complex real-life problems afterwards.

    Situational knowledge vs decontextualisation

    In RME pupils only learn to make math operations by contexts.  For instance, bus-contexts are typical for RME in order to learn addition and subtraction (for instance: eight passengers in the bus;  then two of them leave the bus).   But pupils work such a long time with these contexts that they have difficulties to get rid of these contexts, so they can reach a more abstract level.  They also have problems to apply the operations they learned in these specific bus-contexts, in new situations as well.  They have difficulties to reach the level of decontextualisation.  

    FME teachers on the other hand experience that pupils can easily apply mathematical knowledge and skills to new problems.  Their knowledge doesn’t remain “situational”.   

     

    Conclusion

    PISA 2003 indicates that children in Flanders perform excellently in comparison with counterparts world-wide.  We postulate that a very important factor associated with these high achievement scores is the way of teaching maths in Flanders, the so-called functional math education or FME.

    To understand better the principles of FME, we compared the FME orientation with the RME approach in the Netherlands.  In the RME philosophy we notice a very great appreciation for understanding arithmetic but also a depreciation for the importance of the automaticity processes.  In FME these automaticity processes play a crucial role.  Key factors in these automaticity processes are guided and activating instruction, interactive teaching, fixed representations and standard procedures, pace (short time to gain goals), the importance of factual knowledge and memorising, “naked” exercises, structure, simple and classic problems, and decontexualisation.  FME philosophy also pays attention for “realistic” problems, ut it tries to find a good balance between understanding (= RME orientation!) and automaticity.  Too extreme a shift towards RME can be disastrous especially for weak learners.  There is research evidence (see Feys, 1998, p.41; Seys & Van Biervliet, 1996; Timmermans, 2005).  Even the RME researchers Kraemer and Nelissen found similar research conclusions but strangely still believe in the RME philosophy… (Feys, 1998, p.41)   

     

    References

     

    Beishuizen, M., Wolters, G. & Broers, G. (1991). Mentale rekenprocedures in het getallengebied 20-100 onderzocht met reactietijdmetingen en tempotoetsen [A study of mental procedural skills in arithmetic in the domain of 20-100: control of reaction and speed].  Tijdschrift voor Onderwijsresearch, 16, 19-38.

    de Lange, J. (1995). Assessment : No change without Problems. In T.A. Romberg (Ed.), Reform in School Mathematics and Authentic Assessment. New York: Sunny Press. 

    de Lange, J. (1996).  Using and Applying Mathematics in Education. In A.J. Bishop, et al. (Eds), International handbook of mathematics education (part one).  Kluwer academic publisher.

    De Meyer, I., Pauly, J. & Van de Poele, L. (2005). Learning for Tomorrow’s Problems. First Results. Ghent: Ghent University (see also www.ond.vlaanderen.be/onderwijsstatistieken)

    Feys, af. (1998).  Rekenen tot honderd [Arithemtic up to 100]. Praktijkgids voor de basisschool.  Belgium, Diegem: Kluwer.: Wolters-Plantyn

    Gravemeijer, K.P.E. (1994). Developing Realistic Mathematics Education. Utrecht: CD-b Press /

    Freudenthal Institute, Utrecht University.

    Jones, L. & Allebone, B. (2000).  Differentiation. In V. Koshy, P. Ernest & R. Casey (Eds). Mathematics for primary teachers (pp.196-209). London: Routledge.

     

    Murray, J. (2000). Mental mathematics. In V. Koshy, P. Ernest & R. Casey (Eds). Mathematics for primary teachers (pp.158-171). London: Routledge.

    Papy, G. (1970), Mathématique moderne (1 et 2), Bruxelles: Didier.

    Perfetti, C. (1985), Reading ability. Oxford: University Press.

    Seys, J. & Van Biervliet, P. (1996).  Vaardig splitsen van getallen: veel meer dan inzicht.  Resultaten van een normeringsonderzoek [Partition sums: more than insight. Research results].  Onderwijskrant, 94, 10-16.

    Timmermans, R. (2005). Addition and subtraction strategies: assessment and instruction. Nijmegen: Radboud University.

     

    Treffers, A. (1991).  Realistic mathematics education in The Netherlands 1980-1990. In L. Streefland (Ed.), Realistic Mathematics Education in Primary School. Utrecht: CD-b Press / Freudenthal Institute, Utrecht University.

     

    Van der Heijden, M.K. (1993).  Consistentie van aanpakgedrag.  Een procesdiagnostisch onderzoek naar acht aspecten van hoofdrekenen [Consistency of approach behavior.  A process-assessment research into eight aspects of mental arithmetic].  Lisse, The Netherlands: Swets & Zeitling. 


    Bijdrage 2 

     Kritiek van Raf Feys (vanaf 1989) op constructivistische & contextuele aanpak van het Nederlandse Freudenthal Instituut & van Amerikaanse Standards (1989) die in tal van landen tot wiskundeoorlog leid(de)
    (Commentaar: we begrijpen niet dat in de ZILL-leerplanvisie op het wiskundeonderwijs eveneens gepleit wordt voor overschakeling op het contextuele en ontdekkend wiskundeonderwijs)


    In ons boek ‘Rekenen tot honderd’ ((Wolters-Plantyn, 1998) en elders maakten we een uitvoerige analyse van de nefaste aspecten van het ‘realistisch reken-wiskundeonderwijs’. We vermelden in deze bijdrage enkel een aantal conclusies.

    Terloops Als kritiek op rekenonderwijs van het Freudenthal Instituut publiceerden we in maart 1993 de bijdrage 'Laat het rekenen tot honderd niet in het honderd lopen' in het Nederlandse Tijdschrift 'PanamaPost '( Tijdschrift voor nascholing en onderzoek van het reken-wiskundeonderwijs'). We wilden hiermee onze Noorderburen wakker schudden.

    • Het FI maakte vanaf 1980 een karikatuur van het rekenonderwijs anno 1970 en bestempelde het ten onrechte als louter mechanistisch. Het is nochtans bekend dat de meeste mensen vroeger vlot konden rekenen. De Nederlandse methode ‘Functioneel Rekenen’ van Reynders was bijvoorbeeld een degelijke methode, gebaseerd op een evenwichtige visie.

    Volgens de klassieke vakdidactiek berust degelijk rekenen op inspiratie (inzicht), maar evenzeer en nog meer op transpiratie (inoefenen, automatiseren en memoriseren, parate kennis).
    Het inzicht in bewerkingen e.d. is al bij al niet zo moeilijk als de Freudenthalers het voorstellen en vergt (in de lagere leerjaren) veel minder tijd dan het vlot leren berekenen. Voor het begrip optellen en aftrekken moet men niet eindeloos in klas autobusje spelen à la Jan van den Brink. Naast de weg van kennen naar kunnen, is er ook de weg van kunnen naar kennen. Van ‘Kunnen naar kennen’ was overigens de naam van de Vlaamse methode van Schneider rond 1950.
    De misleidende en kunstmatige tegenstelling tussen realistisch en mechanistisch rekenonderwijs doet geen recht aan de klassieke vakdidactiek en de term ‘realistisch’ kreeg alle mogelijke betekenissen (toepassen op realiteit, zich realiseren, enz.)

    • De sterke kanten van het klassieke rekenen belandden zo in de verdomhoek. Deze ‘verlossende’ opstelling is inherent voor mensen die vrijgesteld worden voor de permanente revolutie van het onderwijs en ook voor de rest van hun leven vrijgesteld willen blijven. Vrijgestelden pakken bijna steeds uit met het verlossingsparadigma i.p.v. ‘vernieuwing in continuïteit’.

    • Het FI onderschat het grote belang van het vlot en gestandaardiseerd hoofdrekenen, het vlot en gestandaardiseerd cijferen, het vlot en gestandaardiseerd metend rekenen en het grote belang van de parate kennis (tafelproducten, formules voor berekening van oppervlakte en inhoud, standaardmaten en metriek stelsel voor metend rekenen …)
    • Vlot, vaardig en geautomatiseerd rekenen en parate kennis is maar mogelijk bij standaardisering en veel oefenen. Het aantal deelstappen moet hierbij zo klein mogelijk zijn omdat het werkgeheugen beperkt is.

    • De Freudenthalers overbeklemtonen het flexibel hoofdrekenen en flexibel cijferen volgens eigenwijze en/of context- of opgave-gebonden berekeningswijzen. Ze noemen dit ten onrechte ‘handig’ en beschouwen de andere aanpakken ten onrechte als onhandig en mechanistisch. Ze verzwijgen verder dat zulk flexibel rekenen op de rug zit van het gestandaardiseerd rekenen. Enkel wie vlot -40 kan berekenen, beseft eventueel dat hij -39 ook vlot kan berekenen via eerst -40 en vervolgens + 1. Zwakkere leerlingen hebben echter toch nog problemen met zulke eenvoudige vormen van flexibel rekenen.

    • Zo worden de klassieke tafels van vermenigvuldiging ook niet meer ingeoefend en opgedreund en dit in groep 4. Ze worden ten onrechte verschoven naar groep 5 en er vervangen door flexibele berekeningswijzen op basis van eigenschappen. Leerlingen berekenen dan bijvoorbeeld 8 x 7 via 4 x 7 = 28, 8 x 7= 28 + 28 = 56. Ze maken veel fouten en de berekening vergt te veel tijd.
    • De tafels van x worden klassiek in het 2de leerjaar aangeleerd. De meeste leerlingen beseffen ook al groep 3 dat 7 x 8 neerkomt op 7 x een groep van 8. Dit inzicht is voldoende.

    • Flexibel eigenschapsrekenen wordt pas in hogere leerjaren gepresenteerd en in de context van grotere opgaven als 13 x 7 waar het toepassen van de eigenschappen een zekere handigheid oplevert.

    • *Kritiek op constructivistische uitgangspunten:

    - te veel constructie van individuele leerling(en), te weinig wiskunde als cultuurproduct, onderschatting van het socio-culturele karakter en functionele betekenis van de wiskunde.
    Te veel respect voor de eigen constructies en aanpakken van de leerling: dit bemoeilijkt het leren van korte en vaste berekeningswijzen, de begeleiding, de verinnerlijking en automatisatie van de rekenvaardigheden. Dit bevordert ook de fixatie van de leerling op eigen, informele constructies en primitieve rekenwijzen. • - eenzijdig ‘bottom-up problem’ solving, overbeklemtoning van zelfontdekte en informele begrippen en berekeningswijzen - te weinig sturing en structurering door de leerkracht, te weinig ‘guided construction of knowledge’. • -te weinig stapsgewijze opgebouwde leerlijnen.

    • Totaal overbodige invoering van het kolomsgewijs rekenen dat de leerlingen zowel in de war brengt inzake het gewone hoofdrekenen als inzake het cijferen dat normaliter ook bij het begin van groep 5 zou moeten starten. Bij het aftrekken met tekorten b.v. wordt het een poespas.

    • Het traditioneel cijferen wordt verwaarloosd en de Freudenthalers introduceren een totaal gekunsteld alternatief dat niets meer te maken heeft met wiskundig cijferen – gebaseerd op splitsing van getal in honderdtallen, enz. Het cijferend delen verwordt tot een soort langdradig hoofdrekenen op basis van schattend aftrekken van happen. Dit is een aanpak met veel deelresultaten die langdradig is en die zich niet laat automatiseren zodat het cijferend delen nooit een vaardigheid kan worden.

    • Onderwaardering voor het klassieke metend rekenen en voor de klassieke meetkunde – met inbegrip van de kennis van basisformules voor de berekening van oppervlakte en inhoud.

    • Te veel en te lang ‘voor-wiskunde’, te lang ‘rekenen in contexten’ als doel op zich; te veel contextualiseren (context- of situatiegebonden rekenwijzen e.d.), te weinig decontextualiseren. Zo worden het vakmatig rekenen en het cijferen afgeremd door binding aan een specifieke context. Een voorbeeld. Door de binding van de aftrekking aan een lineaire context en aan een berekening op de getallenlijn (een traject van 85 km, al 27 km afgelegd, hoeveel km moet ik nog afleggen) wordt het basisinzicht in aftrekken als wegnemen vertroebeld en stimuleert men de leerlingen om aftrekken eenzijdig te interpreten als aanvullend optellen: 85 - 27 wordt dan: 27 + 3 + 10 +10+10+10 + 10 + 5; en achteraf moet men dan nog die vele tussenuitkomsten optellen.

    • Geen evenwichtige en uitgewerkte visie op vraagstukken: te veel kritiek op klassieke vraagstukken, te weinig valabele alternatieven in realistische publicaties en methoden. Te weinig toepassingen (vraagstukken) ook voor metend rekenen en te weinig moeilijke opgaven. We begrepen ook niet waarom de duidelijke term ‘vraagstukken’ moest verdwijnen. De moeilijkheid bij veel context-vraagstukken ligt vaak eerder bij het onvoldoende kennen van de context (b.v. ervaring van parkeren met een auto in opgave over hoeveel auto’s op parking van 70 bij 50 meter), bij het feit dat de tekst te lang en te moeilijk is en bij het feit dat er te veel berekeningen ineens bij betrokken zijn.

    • Foutieve benadering van de aanschouwelijkheid en te lang aanschouwelijk werken. Fixatie van leerlingen op aanschouwelijke hulpmiddelen: de leerlingen mogen veel te lang gebruik maken van hulpmiddelen als getallenlijn, rekenrek … Dit bevordert, het loskomen van de aanschouwelijke steun en het kort en handig uitrekenen De vele moeilijke (lange) voorstellingswijzen van berekeningen op rekenrek en getallenlijn en de vele stappen bemoeilijken een gestandaardiseerde en vlotte berekening.

    • *Kloof tussen idealistische theorie en de praktijk. In een klas met 20 leerlingen is het inspelen op individuele denkwijzen en berekeningswijzen niet haalbaar.
    • Zwakke, maar ook betere leerlingen zijn de dupe.
    • De voorstanders van de realistische aanpak begingen precies dezelfde fouten als de voorstanders van de ‘moderne wiskunde’ destijds. Ze vervingen enkel het ene extreem door het andere. De ‘hemelse’ (te abstracte) New Math werd vervangen door het andere extreem, door de ‘aardse’, contextgebonden en constructivistische aanpak die al te weinig aandacht heeft voor abstrahering en veralgemening en blijft steken in het stadium van de voorwiskunde. De tegenstanders werden verketterd. De kritiek werd doodgezwegen.1



    Geef hier uw reactie door
    Uw naam *
    Uw e-mail *
    URL
    Titel *
    Reactie * Very Happy Smile Sad Surprised Shocked Confused Cool Laughing Mad Razz Embarassed Crying or Very sad Evil or Very Mad Twisted Evil Rolling Eyes Wink Exclamation Question Idea Arrow
      Persoonlijke gegevens onthouden?
    (* = verplicht!)
    Reacties op bericht (0)



    Archief per week
  • 30/04-06/05 2018
  • 23/04-29/04 2018
  • 16/04-22/04 2018
  • 09/04-15/04 2018
  • 02/04-08/04 2018
  • 26/03-01/04 2018
  • 19/03-25/03 2018
  • 12/03-18/03 2018
  • 05/03-11/03 2018
  • 26/02-04/03 2018
  • 19/02-25/02 2018
  • 12/02-18/02 2018
  • 05/02-11/02 2018
  • 29/01-04/02 2018
  • 22/01-28/01 2018
  • 15/01-21/01 2018
  • 08/01-14/01 2018
  • 01/01-07/01 2018
  • 25/12-31/12 2017
  • 18/12-24/12 2017
  • 11/12-17/12 2017
  • 04/12-10/12 2017
  • 27/11-03/12 2017
  • 20/11-26/11 2017
  • 13/11-19/11 2017
  • 06/11-12/11 2017
  • 30/10-05/11 2017
  • 23/10-29/10 2017
  • 16/10-22/10 2017
  • 09/10-15/10 2017
  • 02/10-08/10 2017
  • 25/09-01/10 2017
  • 18/09-24/09 2017
  • 11/09-17/09 2017
  • 04/09-10/09 2017
  • 28/08-03/09 2017
  • 21/08-27/08 2017
  • 14/08-20/08 2017
  • 07/08-13/08 2017
  • 31/07-06/08 2017
  • 24/07-30/07 2017
  • 17/07-23/07 2017
  • 10/07-16/07 2017
  • 03/07-09/07 2017
  • 26/06-02/07 2017
  • 19/06-25/06 2017
  • 05/06-11/06 2017
  • 29/05-04/06 2017
  • 22/05-28/05 2017
  • 15/05-21/05 2017
  • 08/05-14/05 2017
  • 01/05-07/05 2017
  • 24/04-30/04 2017
  • 17/04-23/04 2017
  • 10/04-16/04 2017
  • 03/04-09/04 2017
  • 27/03-02/04 2017
  • 20/03-26/03 2017
  • 13/03-19/03 2017
  • 06/03-12/03 2017
  • 27/02-05/03 2017
  • 20/02-26/02 2017
  • 13/02-19/02 2017
  • 06/02-12/02 2017
  • 30/01-05/02 2017
  • 23/01-29/01 2017
  • 16/01-22/01 2017
  • 09/01-15/01 2017
  • 02/01-08/01 2017
  • 26/12-01/01 2017
  • 19/12-25/12 2016
  • 12/12-18/12 2016
  • 05/12-11/12 2016
  • 28/11-04/12 2016
  • 21/11-27/11 2016
  • 14/11-20/11 2016
  • 07/11-13/11 2016
  • 31/10-06/11 2016
  • 24/10-30/10 2016
  • 17/10-23/10 2016
  • 10/10-16/10 2016
  • 03/10-09/10 2016
  • 26/09-02/10 2016
  • 19/09-25/09 2016
  • 12/09-18/09 2016
  • 05/09-11/09 2016
  • 29/08-04/09 2016
  • 22/08-28/08 2016
  • 15/08-21/08 2016
  • 25/07-31/07 2016
  • 18/07-24/07 2016
  • 11/07-17/07 2016
  • 04/07-10/07 2016
  • 27/06-03/07 2016
  • 20/06-26/06 2016
  • 13/06-19/06 2016
  • 06/06-12/06 2016
  • 30/05-05/06 2016
  • 23/05-29/05 2016
  • 16/05-22/05 2016
  • 09/05-15/05 2016
  • 02/05-08/05 2016
  • 25/04-01/05 2016
  • 18/04-24/04 2016
  • 11/04-17/04 2016
  • 04/04-10/04 2016
  • 28/03-03/04 2016
  • 21/03-27/03 2016
  • 14/03-20/03 2016
  • 07/03-13/03 2016
  • 29/02-06/03 2016
  • 22/02-28/02 2016
  • 15/02-21/02 2016
  • 08/02-14/02 2016
  • 01/02-07/02 2016
  • 25/01-31/01 2016
  • 18/01-24/01 2016
  • 11/01-17/01 2016
  • 04/01-10/01 2016
  • 28/12-03/01 2016
  • 21/12-27/12 2015
  • 14/12-20/12 2015
  • 07/12-13/12 2015
  • 30/11-06/12 2015
  • 23/11-29/11 2015
  • 16/11-22/11 2015
  • 09/11-15/11 2015
  • 02/11-08/11 2015
  • 26/10-01/11 2015
  • 19/10-25/10 2015
  • 12/10-18/10 2015
  • 05/10-11/10 2015
  • 28/09-04/10 2015
  • 21/09-27/09 2015
  • 14/09-20/09 2015
  • 07/09-13/09 2015
  • 31/08-06/09 2015
  • 24/08-30/08 2015
  • 17/08-23/08 2015
  • 10/08-16/08 2015
  • 03/08-09/08 2015
  • 27/07-02/08 2015
  • 20/07-26/07 2015
  • 13/07-19/07 2015
  • 06/07-12/07 2015
  • 29/06-05/07 2015
  • 22/06-28/06 2015
  • 15/06-21/06 2015
  • 08/06-14/06 2015
  • 01/06-07/06 2015
  • 25/05-31/05 2015
  • 18/05-24/05 2015
  • 11/05-17/05 2015
  • 04/05-10/05 2015
  • 27/04-03/05 2015
  • 20/04-26/04 2015
  • 13/04-19/04 2015
  • 06/04-12/04 2015
  • 30/03-05/04 2015
  • 23/03-29/03 2015
  • 16/03-22/03 2015
  • 09/03-15/03 2015
  • 02/03-08/03 2015
  • 23/02-01/03 2015
  • 16/02-22/02 2015
  • 09/02-15/02 2015
  • 02/02-08/02 2015
  • 26/01-01/02 2015
  • 19/01-25/01 2015
  • 12/01-18/01 2015
  • 05/01-11/01 2015
  • 29/12-04/01 2015
  • 22/12-28/12 2014
  • 15/12-21/12 2014
  • 08/12-14/12 2014
  • 01/12-07/12 2014
  • 24/11-30/11 2014
  • 17/11-23/11 2014
  • 10/11-16/11 2014
  • 03/11-09/11 2014
  • 27/10-02/11 2014
  • 20/10-26/10 2014
  • 13/10-19/10 2014
  • 06/10-12/10 2014
  • 29/09-05/10 2014
  • 22/09-28/09 2014
  • 15/09-21/09 2014
  • 08/09-14/09 2014
  • 01/09-07/09 2014
  • 25/08-31/08 2014
  • 18/08-24/08 2014
  • 11/08-17/08 2014
  • 04/08-10/08 2014
  • 28/07-03/08 2014
  • 21/07-27/07 2014
  • 14/07-20/07 2014
  • 07/07-13/07 2014
  • 30/06-06/07 2014
  • 23/06-29/06 2014
  • 16/06-22/06 2014
  • 09/06-15/06 2014
  • 02/06-08/06 2014
  • 26/05-01/06 2014
  • 19/05-25/05 2014
  • 12/05-18/05 2014
  • 05/05-11/05 2014
  • 28/04-04/05 2014
  • 14/04-20/04 2014
  • 07/04-13/04 2014
  • 31/03-06/04 2014
  • 24/03-30/03 2014
  • 17/03-23/03 2014
  • 10/03-16/03 2014
  • 03/03-09/03 2014
  • 24/02-02/03 2014
  • 17/02-23/02 2014
  • 10/02-16/02 2014
  • 03/02-09/02 2014
  • 27/01-02/02 2014
  • 20/01-26/01 2014
  • 13/01-19/01 2014
  • 06/01-12/01 2014
  • 30/12-05/01 2014
  • 23/12-29/12 2013
  • 16/12-22/12 2013
  • 09/12-15/12 2013
  • 02/12-08/12 2013
  • 25/11-01/12 2013
  • 18/11-24/11 2013
  • 11/11-17/11 2013
  • 04/11-10/11 2013
  • 28/10-03/11 2013
  • 21/10-27/10 2013

    E-mail mij

    Druk op onderstaande knop om mij te e-mailen.


    Gastenboek

    Druk op onderstaande knop om een berichtje achter te laten in mijn gastenboek


    Blog als favoriet !

    Klik hier
    om dit blog bij uw favorieten te plaatsen!


    Blog tegen de wet? Klik hier.
    Gratis blog op https://www.bloggen.be - Bloggen.be, eenvoudig, gratis en snel jouw eigen blog!